Christopher Parker, United States Navy

EMS Program Manager, Bay Area (Livermore, CA) Campus, American Medical Response

Growing up around San Diego, Christopher Parker was always aware of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps, which have a large presence in that city. And through grandparents who had served in World War II, there was a tradition of service in his family. So, when he decided he wanted to be a medic, the Navy was an obvious choice.

Parker served as a Hospital Corpsman with the Fleet Marine Corps, caring for sick and injured USMC personnel and, when he was stationed back in the U.S., their civilian dependents. Traveling all over the world with the Fleet, Parker enjoyed meeting people from other countries and getting to know their culture. When he decided to further his career in healthcare, he left the Navy to go to paramedic School.

Upon graduation, he began his career as a paramedic with AMR in 2001. Today, he is the EMS Program Manager for the Bay Area (Livermore) NCTI campus, where he trains students in EMT and Paramedic skills. He also works closely with AMR operations in other states to assist with staffing needs.

“My military training prepared me for my EMS career in several ways, he said. “First and foremost, I was exposed to a vast amount of individuals from different cultures. I learned to respect their beliefs and values, which enabled me to see the world a little differently. My training also taught me focus, a strong work ethic and to always take care of my team.

Years of Service and Rank Achieved
Parker served for five years, from 1996 to 2001. He attained the rank of Petty Officer 3rd Class (HM3 FMF)

Countries Visited or in Which He Served
Parker traveled the world with the Fleet marine Corps. He was stationed in Okinawa, Japan from 1997 to 1999 and also spent time in Singapore, Thailand, Bali, Australia, Russia, Bahrain, Dubai and Kuwait.

How Military Training Benefited Civilian Career
Parker says that the instilled principle of taking care of his team transfers directly to his work with AMR. That means ensuring they have the tools, resources and support to do their job. “To do this, you need to understand their job and their distractions in order to lead them,” said parker. “Their success is my success.”